Translation Value

Translation: Price is what you pay, Value is what you get

Picture the scene, it’s the weekend, the sun is shining, not a cloud in the sky, a perfect day for a leisurely drive. About an hour into your jaunt around the local country roads, you notice a strange clunking sound coming from under the bonnet. It looks like a trip to the garage is in order. Once you get home you call the guy (or girl) you always call when your car needs attention. You drop it off at the garage and wait for the workshop to call, what are the first three things you want to learn from that call?… Most people would likely answer along the lines of “can they fix it, what is it going to cost and how long is it going to take”, probably in that order.

Now you are probably wondering what going for a drive and suffering an impending breakdown has to do with anything, well I’ll get to that. About a year ago I was talking to a chap in a pub, the best stories always start with that line right? His name is Dave, you wouldn’t say he was anything out of the ordinary, casually dressed, glasses, drives a van, all very run of the mill, he wouldn’t mind me saying that, he’d probably agree. Anyway, I sat at the bar waiting for my friends to finally show up and just happened to strike up a conversation with him. He told me about how he works in a garage and has done probably longer than I’ve been alive, another classic line from the book of pub stories huh. Dave’s customers go through exactly the same ritual as I had you imagine at the beginning, but when it comes to that phone call, his customers have slightly different expectations. Read more

the top 3 apps for travellers

Top 3 Language Translation Traveller Apps

In today’s digitally connected age we are fortunate to have connectivity and access to our smart phone/tablet of choice virtually everywhere we travel. Regardless of location, in most instances we will be able to utilise our smart phones and tablets in some capacity. One of the advantages of this new era in technology is that the savvy traveller can now take advantage of the many wonderful applications designed to enhance any type of trip. When it comes to traveling to new lands it is always handy to have easy to use, informative and fast language translation tools at your fingertips.

As technology tears down cultural boundaries it is now becoming much easier to communicate across borders. Smart phones and tablets are now more then ever before allowing for language barriers to be broken in ways we never once imagined. If you’re like me and seem to not be able to go anywhere without your personal electronic devices then this is a great opportunity to review some of top language translation applications currently available.

Obviously (and I’m not just saying this because I’m biased) none of these will replace or do the same job as a professional translator or interpreter. But if you need to get by and/or want to have some fun while you’re on your travels these will help. So here you go… 3 language translation apps for the modern traveller. Read more

Top 5 Language Careers

Top 5 Careers For Language Lovers

Since the dawn of time language has been fundamental to the way we interact with one another. When cultures expanded and populations grew, foreign languages were born out of a necessity for local, centralised communication. As time passed and humans became more abundant and advanced, so too did languages. While some languages have died and some are yet to be born, the demand for foreign language skills is only expanding in the modern era.

When contemplating foreign language related careers, the first choices we think of are most likely that of a translator, interpreter, foreign language teacher or even CEO of a Language Services Company :), but these jobs only scratch the surface of what you can achieve. Of course any one of these professions is a great option for a language lover, but what if you wanted to cultivate your passion for language doing something a bit more unique or intriguing?

These days talented linguists are not limited to such narrow career paths, and they often have interests beyond just learning, teaching and speaking new languages. Studying languages is known to develop core competencies that appeal to almost every type of professional field giving linguaphiles a plethora of valuable career opportunities that they may have never thought of. Read more

Translation of Clinical Trials

Translation for Clinical Trials

Over the past decade, clinical trials for new drugs, treatments and medical devices have increasingly been conducted in countries overseas. Emerging markets offer attractive benefits to sponsors, including significant cost reductions, easier recruitment and faster study completion. Top countries for outsourcing clinical research include India, China and Russia.

The need for quality medical translation grows as more clinical trials are conducted in emerging nations. Clinical research accounts for a significant percentage of the cost of bringing a new drug to market, but poor-quality translation during the trial period can incur even more significant costs. Put simply, the wrong translation provider can compromise an entire study.  Read more

8 Fun Facts about the Chinese New Year

8 Fun Facts about the Chinese New Year

The Chinese year begins on 19 February 2015. This year its the year of the sheep, it can also refer to the year of the goat or ram. The Chinese word yáng applies to both goats and sheep, with shānyáng specifically goats and miányáng sheep. In English, the sign may be called either. The interpretation of sheep or goat depends on culture. In Vietnamese, the sign is mui, which is unambiguously goat. In Japan, on the other hand, the sign is hitsuji,sheep; while in Korea and Mongolia the sign is also sheep or ram).

To help you celebrate, here are 8 fun facts about this holiday (from Wikipedia):

  1. The traditional Chinese New Year celebration lasts 15 days. This makes it the longest and most important festival for Chinese all over the world. A public holiday in countries such as China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Philippines, Taiwan, Macau, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand. Also it is celebrated in Chinatowns all over the world.
  2. 2015 is the year of the sheep. People born in this year are said to find comfort in organisation and planning and tend to be guarded towards letting people get close to them
  3. Everyone goes home for the Chinese New Year celebrations, if they can. The period just before the Chinese New Year, called chunyun, is the busiest travel time of the entire year. All across China and beyond, you’ll find people on their way home to spend this time with their families.
  4. The Chinese New Year is seen as the perfect time to do some spring cleaning.  Traditionally, it was believed that cleaning house for the new year’s celebrations swept bad luck away and helped ensure good fortune in the year to come.
  5. Traditional foods include fish, which is served at the end of the New Year’s meal and symbolizes abundance, and a sticky fruitcake called Neen Gow or Nian Gow.
  6. Red decorations are everywhere, because the colour red is considered to be one of the luckiest colours of all.  Older family members use red envelopes to give gifts of cash to their younger relatives.
  7. Shou Sui is the practice of staying up until midnight as a family to greet the new year.
  8. During the Chinese New Year, people often greet each other by shouting “auspicious phrases” thought to bring luck, like “gōng xǐ fā cái,” which translates to “Congratulations and be prosperous.” Children sometimes use the following variant of this greeting when they are feeling cheeky: “gōng xǐ fā cái, hóng bāo ná lái.” That means “Congratulations and be prosperous, now give me a red envelope!”

You can find out more about Chinese New Year traditions in an article written by one of our translators in Beijing

 

It's the year of the snake!

Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year, a festive event celebrated by people all around the world (the image above was taken in Yokohama, Japan). As you may well know, the Chinese New Year is represented by one of 12 different animals which cycle annually, the sheep, the monkey, the rooster, the dog, the pig, the rat, the ox, the tiger, the rabbit, the dragon and the snake.

to see which one you are take a look at this Chinese zodiac calendar.

 

Read more

tips for a successful international franchise

Tips for a Successful International Franchise

Franchising can be a great way of expanding your business operations overseas. If, after analysing your business model, you decide franchising is the best solution for growing your international operations, it is imperative that efficient communication strategies are considered and developed for the individual regions.

1. Control your management

A primary concern is often the ability to manage distant franchisees effectively; they are of course independent business in their own right. This management freedom can cause issues with brand misrepresentation that could lead to costly legal complications. The majority of these issues are born of miscommunication and assumptions. Your company`s strategy, business goals and vision need to be clearly understood, for that you will need to prepare and translate a cohesive set of guidelines so that everyone understands the business and their individual role within it. Centralising that documentation, having it written, legally checked, approved and translated in the UK, is the first crucial step in taking you closer to a successful international franchise. It is the key foundation of any global business… If you already operate franchises abroad, it’s never too late to create and distribute a set of standardised company guidelines. Read more

Regulation Information for Medical Translation

Medical Translation Regulations

Medical translation is serious business. Mistakes can be a matter of life or death. As such, medical translation is one of the most heavily regulated segments of the translation industry.

Translation vendors and clients alike must navigate a complex labyrinth of rules at the local, national and international levels in order to stay compliant. Regulations govern what material must be translated, how data is transmitted and stored and the translation process itself.

Medical translation requirements can vary greatly depending on the product in question and the target markets. In most markets you need to have public-facing documents such as patient information sheets, marketing materials and forms for clinical trials translated into the local language. You may need to translate into minority languages, as well. Most of the time, material aimed at healthcare professionals must be translated, too, along with patent applications and applications for regulatory approval. Read more

The differences between celebrations of New Year in Britain and Russia

Britain and Russia: Celebrating the New Year

The world holds a diverse expanse of cultures, each celebrating and embracing the New Year in different ways. How far does the language of a particular country affect the way in which New Year is celebrated? Popular British cultural makes it possible to refer to someone as a ‘scrooge’, a Dickensian reference to the fact that he or she does not like Christmas.

But what about New Year? What traditions exist at this time of the year, and how does our language support them? I am going to explore a few of these traditions and the language involved in celebrating them, drawing upon my experience of Russian and English New Year. Read more

Krampus1

5 Creepy Christmas Traditions from Around the World

‘Tis the season to be jolly…but in some parts of the world, Christmas isn’t all “Jingle Bells”  and “Fa La La La’s.” Here are 5 Christmas traditions from around the world that are more creepy than festive.

1. Austria and other Alpine Countries – The Krampus

If you’re good, Santa Claus brings you presents. If you’re bad, he gives you coal or possibly even a switch for your parents to beat you with, right? Right. Unless you live in certain Alpine regions in Europe, including Austria, Romania, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia and Croatia. There, the bad kids have to contend with the Krampus, a nightmarish horned demon who basically acts as Santa’s enforcer. The Krampus distributes coal, bundles of birch twigs called “ruten,” and sometimes carries a washtub in which he drowns bad children so he can eat them. Read more