UK export guide to France

Export Guide for France

Translation and localisation support plays a major role in a successful export strategy so K International is producing a number of country-specific export guides to provide your business with some helpful information. You can read the introduction and view other guides as they become available right here.

France is a country that embraces commerce, offering a dynamic, professional business environment in which companies have every opportunity to thrive. As a leading economic powerhouse, France is a member of the G7 (which was formerly the G8), as well as the OECD, European Union and World Trade Organization.

France’s proximity to the UK (the Strait of Dover is just 20.7 miles at its narrowest point) means that the two countries have long-standing business ties. Many UK companies look to France to begin their international trading ventures.

This France business culture guide has been written to support UK-based exporters with key details about exporting their goods and services to France.

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Dracula in Translation

Dracula in Translation

It’s almost Halloween! That means it’s an excellent time to reread your old horror favorites like Bram Stoker’s Dracula. Most cultures have some sort of indigenous vampire mythology. But Stoker’s novel helped spread the modern, Western image of the vampire around the world.  What dark, supernatural powers made it so influential?

The power of translation, of course! Here are 6 facts about Dracula around the world that you might not have heard before.

Dracula is available in at least 29 languages.

Dracula has been continuously in print since it was first published in 1897. During that time, it has been translated into at least 29 languages. That’s not quite Translation Hall of Fame material but it’s not too shabby, either.

Dracula’s origins are lost in translation.

Many people think Stoker based Dracula on the historical Wallachian ruler Vlad III, or Vlad the Impaler. But this is likely a myth. There are certainly some similarities between the two figures. For example, some English speaking texts call Vlad Tepes “Voivode Dracula.” And the Count talks about fighting Turks as a mortal. But there’s not much evidence that Stoker modeled his fictional vampire on Vlad the Impaler. Read more

Food retail trends in Italy

Current Trends in Italy’s Food Retail Market

So how do Italians buy food, really? If you’re thinking of food markets in every town, brimming with people buying organic meat and vegetables directly from farmers, you may be in for a partial disappointment. In today’s Italy, most people buy their food at the supermarket.

That’s not to say that love for good food has disappeared. Modern life may be less bucolic, but supermarkets in Italy have come a long way in the pursuit of quality.

What an Italian supermarket looks like

At first glance, Italian supermarkets are very similar to any store in the UK. However, if you take a closer look you’ll notice that some products occupy a different amount of shelf space. For example, you could find:

  •  A limited choice of butter and a wider choice of olive oil
  • Lots of different brands of mineral water
  • Almost no presence of foreign wines
  • A wider choice of local ham and cheese
  • More calf and less lamb meat. Although less common, horse and rabbit can also be found.

At the same time, you could recognise many current food trends: vegan, vegetarian, gluten-free, organic, etc. Read more

UK Export Guide for Germany

Export Guide for Germany

Translation and localisation support plays a major role in a successful export strategy so K International is producing a number of country-specific export guides to provide your business with some helpful information. You can read the introduction and view other guides as they become available right here.

German businesses have a reputation for innovation and productivity. They are also known for supporting worker progression from the shop floor to senior management, to ensure that those in charge of the company know the business inside out. Germany has used this approach to build financial strength that sees it exporting goods around the world. It is also an important importer of goods from the UK.

This business culture guide is designed to provide UK-based exporters with the facts and figures they need in order to get to grips with this key export market.

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lullabies from around the world

12 Nightmarish Lullabies From Around the World

Mothers everywhere sing babies to soothe them to sleep. But the songs we sing are sometimes less than comforting. Consider, for example, the first verse of Rockabye Baby, which ends with a baby falling out of a tree.

Like the original versions of most fairy tales, there’s a dark undercurrent in a quite a few of the traditional songs we sing to our children. And the urge to soothe babies with creepy songs is apparently found almost everywhere. Need proof? Here are 12 sweet-sounding but nightmarish lullabies from around the world.

Nightmarish Lullabies from Around the World: Iceland

When it comes to creepy lullabies, Iceland may take the prize. Here are 2 examples:

Bíum, Bíum, Bambalóu


The scene described here would make an excellent opening for a horror movie. Here’s an English translation:

Bíum bíum bambalo/Bambaló og dillidillidó/My little friend I lull to rest/ But outside, a face looms at the window.

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8 Stories About Language and Translation for September

Are you having trouble getting over the hump this week? Could you use some midweek motivation? Why not take a few minutes to catch up on all the news you’ve missed over the past month from the world of language and translation? We’ve handpicked 8 interesting stories, so grab a cup of your favorite pumpkin spice-flavored beverage, sit back, relax and enjoy:

Should you learn a local dialect instead of a global language?

That’s the idea behind this article from Quartz. The article posits that since Google Translate already has global languages covered (yeah, right!), it makes more sense to learn a local language like Welsh or Irish instead.

We’re all for more people learning smaller local languages, obviously. But machine translation still has a long way to go, and it will be a long time, if ever, before being able to speak another global language becomes an “obsolete” skill.

That said, there’s evidence that once you’re fluent in two languages, it’s easier to pick up a third. So, maybe you can have your cake and eat it, too.

Looking for some global language learning suggestions?  See The Top Languages To Learn in 2017 Read more

The Languages of Moana 

If you’ve got kids of a certain age, you’ve probably seen Disney’s Moana more than once.  In fact, you can probably sing the soundtrack from memory, or at least the parts of it that are in English.

But what about the parts that aren’t? Have you ever wondered about the other languages used in the film? Have you ever been curious about the meaning of the song that you’ve had stuck in your head since the last time you saw the movie?  Here’s some background on the languages of Moana, along with some helpful translations.

The Languages in Moana

The English-language version of the film is primarily in English (obviously.) However,  the character names are Polynesian:

  • Moana means “ocean” in Maori, Hawaiian, and most other Polynesian languages.
  • Hei Hei means “chicken.”
  • Moana’s father Tui is named after a New Zealand bird.
  • Her grandmother’s name,  Tala, means “story” in Samoan.
  • Moana’s pet pig is named Pua, which means “flower.”

The soundtrack showcases Polynesian languages more fully.  For example, “We Know the Way” includes lyrics in both Samoan and Tokelauan. Read more

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