Translating Your Food Supplement Packaging

Translating Your Food Supplement Packaging: 3 Important Aspects to Consider

If you are a manufacturer of dietary supplements, functional drinks, or any other food with added health benefits, the whole world is now your potential marketplace.

Over the last few years, health-conscious consumers have fallen out of love with the idea of “dieting” and started to embrace an all over “healthy lifestyle”. The trend is set, and it’s already more than a fad: people want “real”, unprocessed food, possibly organic and sustainably farmed and they’re not afraid to take supplements to achieve optimum nutritional balance.

As a result, functional and fortified foods, dietary supplements and nutraceuticals are growing in popularity, and technology makes it easier than ever to export abroad.

Preparing your food supplement product packaging for a foreign market goes beyond translation. It’s also about making it fully compliant with local food regulations.

The first important distinction is whether the country you’re exporting to has a pre-market evaluation or not. In the US, for example, no approval is required to market food supplements. Manufacturers and distributors are responsible for their efficacy and safety. Canada, on the other hand, has a quite stringent pre-market approval process.

Whatever the case, translating your food supplement package correctly is something you’ll want to get right first time. Product recalls can happen anytime and for a variety of reasons: lack of ingredient compliance, misleading claims or incorrectly displayed labels.

Although regulations are always complicated for the uninitiated, here are three important aspects to consider when translating your packaging for a new market: Read more

Infographic: How translators can market themselves online

Infographic: How Translators Can Market Themselves Online

In our field we work with literally 1000’s of translators, sometimes they come to us directly, but often we need to go looking for specialists with linguistic skills in specific areas like document localisation or website translation. It’s here where we noticed a problem, a great many translators aren’t making themselves visible to potential online customers anywhere near as much as they could. Some of the very best translators we have on our books don’t have any kind of online presence, which made us think, maybe we can help.

Being a freelance translator is a competitive business, even more so if you are just starting out. To make sure you have the best chance of getting work in from clients, you absolutely must make sure those clients can find you. More and more people are using the internet to research and buy translation services and you really don’t want to be left behind as this trend shows no sign of slowing. It’s not enough to set up a profile on Proz.com and wait for the jobs to roll in, thousands are already doing exactly that… you need to start taking a proactive approach and make sure potential clients have the best chance of finding you vs. your competition, how do you do that? Well besides being great at what you do, marketing yourself effectively online can help enormously. Read more

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15 Translation Resources for Retail Organisations

15 Translation Resources for Retail Businesses

Thanks to the close relationships we have developed with commercial brands, we have engineerd a set of proven localisation services specifically for the retail sector. Over the years we have gained an indepth knowledge of the retail sector and their translation requirements when it comes to getting products on shelf abroad.  While translation may only be a small part of the global sales process when viewed in isolation, its overall importance to the success of an international retail project cannot be underestimated . Here you can find 15 of our most popular retail translation focused resources, guides and articles that have been produced over the past few years. They will help to give you an understanding of the process of localisation and the role it plays in developing an international commercial business. Read more

Global-Branding - Coke-Can

5 Examples of Powerful Global Branding in Action

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In the 1980s, only a handful of brands, such as Coca Cola and IBM, ruled the global stage. However, as the internet continues to lower the barriers to entering new markets, an increasing number of companies are able to achieve this level of influence.

Today, building a global brand requires a lot more than simply translating your website into different languages. The most successful companies understand that consistent and universally appealing messaging has to be combined with an understanding of local culture and tastes – a tactic that’s known as a ‘glocal’ strategy.

Here are five examples of powerful global branding in action. Read more

5 Lessons You Can Learn From the World's Biggest Businesses

International Expansion: 5 Lessons You Can Learn From the World’s Biggest Businesses

Sometimes it can seem like the world is smaller than ever – that we live in a global village where international borders mean little.

However, when it comes to international business expansion, the importance of cultural differences cannot be underestimated. Indeed, many businesses have found out the hard way that what works at home can go down very differently in a foreign market.

Here, we present five lessons you can learn from some of the world’s biggest businesses’ most notable successes and failures. Read more

Website translation – person typing on a laptop

The Multi-Lingual Digital World: Why You Need to Translate Your Site

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The internet is an incredibly powerful tool for businesses. Since it first became available to the public in the late 1980s, it’s transformed the commercial landscape, allowing companies to easily market their products to consumers all over the world.

However, while the internet started out as an almost entirely English-language based resource, the volume of foreign language content, as well as foreign language users, has dramatically increased.

And with around 42% of consumers saying they would never purchase products or services in other languages, targeting these users, in their own tongue, clearly makes sense for businesses.

Here’s why you need to translate your site to compete in the global marketplace. Read more

How to Get International Expansion Right

How to Get International Expansion Right: Advice from 7 Entrepreneurs & Experts

Once you’ve established a successful business, it’s natural to want to expand into different markets. Particularly as nearly all of the world’s biggest companies – from Tesco to Google – operate on an international scale.

However, much the same as setting up a business in the first place, successfully targeting international audiences is far from easy. From local customs and colloquialisms to superstitions and humour, every region is entirely unique, making a ‘one size fits’ all approach sure to fail. Read more

5 Ways to Give Your Digital Content International Appeal

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Over the past 20 years, ecommerce sales have skyrocketed. And this unstoppable growth looks set to continue, with Bigcommerce predicting that worldwide B2C ecommerce revenues will reach $2 trillion in 2015.

The message for businesses is clear – the internet offers brands huge opportunities to reach new markets and increase sales. Read more

5 tips for Website Localisation

Digital Globalisation: 5 Essential Website Localisation Tips

Digital globalisation has dramatically lowered the barriers to entering new markets. But creating a successful multi-lingual site is far more complex than you might think.

Visit the regional versions of the McDonald’s website and the pages you see will have numerous differences – and not just in the language used. Everything from the layout to imagery and symbols will have subtle variations.

There’s good reason for this. McDonald’s, like most successful global brands, understands the importance of tailoring their content to each of their international audiences – a process known as localisation.

Here are five essential tips for a successful localisation strategy. Read more

International business expansion - man at airport

Culture Guide for Businesses Expanding Internationally

Every year, hundreds of entrepreneurial companies will consider international expansion as a growth strategy – and with potential rewards including increased revenue and a wider range of customers, why wouldn’t they?

Most of these businesses will know that thorough planning, plentiful finances and accurate translation are central to their success. However, the importance of local culture, as well as the unexpected complications it can cause, is often overlooked.

Here’s why an in-depth understanding of local customs, assumptions and biases should be at the heart of everything you do. Read more

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