A selection of articles specifically written by our dedicated team of translators, project & account managers. Here you will get an insight into the folks at K International, with articles about their experiences and project work.

The Wings of a Dove

The Wings of a Dove

As some of you know… We’ve had some strange noises in the roof the last couple of days and saw a couple of white doves trapped up there. We’d tried to get them out but couldn’t so had to call the local bird catcher to do what he had to do. He was going to come in at the weekend and put some traps in the roof. Read more

Twitter Enters the Murky World of Machine Translation

Twitter Enters the Murky World of Machine Translation

Last week you may have heard, or even seen, that Twitter has been trialling automated translation of tweets from certain individuals in Egypt. Following the recent political upheaval, the former president Mohammed Morsi, opposition leader Mohammed ElBaradei and Arab Spring activist Wael Ghonim have all had tweets made available to non-Arabic speaking readers.

Read more

Communicating for the ALC

Communicating for the ALC

As part of our continued drive to increase co-operation between language companies, we worked alongside Dynamic Language in Seattle to provide an information delivery system for the Association of Language companies (ALC) of which we are both members.

Our aim, and that of the ALC, is to improve quality and systems within the translation industry by allowing a free flowing exchange of ideas and information. At present association members are really only able to network at conferences that take place a few times a year. Together with Dynamic language, K International sought to increase this contact opportunity to an always available feature of membership. Read more

A Gaijin in Tokyo

A Gaijin in Tokyo

In our last article, Alison noted how lazy we Brits are when it comes to getting a handle on the native language when preparing to travel abroad. From my own experience I’ve seen just how extensive this can be and I’m guilty as charged.

In both 2011 and 2012 I travelled to Tokyo for a combined total of 5 weeks. As a generally reserved chap, I wanted to try and make sure that I could be polite and avoid any basic cultural faux pas. So I learnt how to say “please”, “thank you”, “excuse me” & gave myself a crash course in Japanese numeracy and most important of all, ensured I could order a beer. A bit of light reading from a guide book and off I went.
Read more

Are Bad Translators Driving Out Good Translators?

Are Bad Translators Driving Out Good Translators?

this is a guest post written by our partner company Interpreters and Translators, Inc. from Manchester, Connecticut USA

Paul Sulzberger on his blog, The Translation Business, recently asked whether bad translators are driving out good translators. Paul’s posting tackles the issue of how the need for translation is growing steeply but the fees translators earn are decreasing. The posting is an interview with a 30 year veteran of the industry, Luigi Muzii who voices some strong opinions that we thought bear repeating.

Read more

English Across the Pond

English: Across the Pond.

When you consider the differences between the United States and Britain, it’s not hard to conclude that they are, ultimately, much the same. While there is 3,000 or so miles separating these tiny Isles in Northern Europe from the vast continent of the North Americas physically, it’s merely a drop in the ocean in most ways. Read more

Ponglish: Diary of a Pole

Ponglish: Diary of a Pole

Eight years ago I arrived in the UK with my fellow countrymen: rocket scientists, brain surgeons, state attorneys, film directors and hairdressers. They let us flow out of the plane and spread all over the country.

Back home, in Poland, I grew up watching Mr. Bean, listening to Brit Rock and thinking every Londoner has marmalade on toast with tea for breakfast. Having lived here for nearly a decade I have developed an affection to my current whereabouts. I can’t really imagine living without this beloved dry humour! Even though Mr. Bean is yet to be spotted.

Apart from the friendly mentality of the Brits (most of you will frown now), I like the language. Which paradoxically becomes a lingua franca even amongst the Poles themselves. Some fifteen years ago I had my auntie come over from the USA, she tended to throw in some odd American-sounding words into her ever exaggerated statements. Back then I thought: “What did she catch out there?!” Read more

The ALC Unconference

I have to admit I was a little sceptical about taking 3 days out of the office and travelling 5000 miles to something called an unconference.

As a new CEO/business owner in the language industry I am always looking for opportunities to develop my own knowledge and grow my company so threw caution to the wind and took the chance.

After a day’s journey from London I arrived on Wednesday at the first Association of Language Companies’ Unconference at the PGA National Resort Florida.

First impressions were good!  Read more

London Tube Translation

Translating the Tube

You may have heard London’s long standing tube network hit a milestone this month, 150 years old! 270 stations, more than 200 miles of track and an incredible 3 million passengers a day on average, that’s a lot of newspapers.

It’s been a busy time for our friends at Transport for London, with more than half a million foreign visitors pitching up to enjoy both the Olympics and Paralympics last Summer alone. With an influx of so many people using the iconic tube network, Transport for London had to make sure that everyone was able to find their way around, a pretty epic task! Read more

Translating Fast Fashion

We recently developed a solution for a very large European retailer to help them to localise/translate all of their packaging for their dynamic range of clothing.

The challenge in this space is to provide translation that is ‘on trend’, error free and makes best use of all the previously translated material, which helps to dramatically lower the unit cost per word to translate. When we reviewed the existing translation solution we found that the translation was being stored on a shared excel sheet in head office.

The theory was great, if they’d translated something once then that translation could be re-used for future packaging at (virtually) zero cost. But in practice it meant that no one was responsible for the data and the spreadsheet had to be emailed around people outside of the ‘loop’. Comments and suggestions were not imported into the master list, the context of the translation was often wrong and the quality of the translation never really improved over time. Read more

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