A selection of articles specifically written by our dedicated team of translators, project & account managers. Here you will get an insight into the folks at K International, with articles about their experiences and project work.

The difference between Marketing translation and Transcreation

Marketing Translation Vs. Transcreation: What’s the Difference?

Many companies devote energy, time and money into developing their marketing collateral, but tend to do so purely with a domestic audience in mind. When it comes to presenting your brand to new markets overseas, the cultural and linguistic barriers can seem rather daunting but they are imperative considerations if your international campaign is to be a success. This is precisely why professional marketing translation and transcreation services exist.

What is transcreation?

Transcreation is best summed up as creative international advertising translation. The act of Transcreation itself refers to a message being presented in another language in a way that has been moulded to suit a new audience. Specifically used with a marketing focus, the idea is to elicit the same emotions, wants and needs in the new audience as were intended for the domestic audience of the original message. This can involve the creation of new imagery, branding and copy. These alterations remain true to the spirit of the original (though they may differ greatly in appearance) and produce the same end result (usually, making the audience want to buy the product in question).

A variety of other terms are used to refer to transcreation. These include creative translation, international copy adaptation, cultural adaptation and cross-market copywriting. Read more

Export packaging: does yours tick all the boxes

Export packaging: does yours tick all the boxes?

There’s no getting away from it: we live in a global marketplace. Despite some questioning the notion that globalisation is always for the common good, the vast majority of businesses will continue to look beyond their borders to grow revenues inline with their ambitions.

Once the preserve of big corporations, international trade is now so much more accessible, thanks to better communications, improved supply chains, faster payment infrastructures and, of course, the advent of e-commerce.

So it’s a particularly exciting time for SMES who, almost from the get-go, can start branching out and sell products overseas. However, increased opportunities like this usually come with increased challenges and risks. This is, perhaps, especially true for smaller companies which may not be as well prepared as their more established counterparts.

One such challenge is complying with the varied demands of food packaging regulations in all your target markets. Read more

K International customer satisfaction results infographic

Customer Satisfaction Infographic

At K International, we are dedicated to providing the highest levels of customer service in the language industry. To make sure we are performing in line with these standards, we’ve been asking our active clients to complete a short satisfaction survey. So far we’ve had 174 complete responses and we are very pleased to share these intial results in the infographic below. Of course, there is always room for improvement, so we won’t be resting on our laurels – customer satisfaction is a defining quality of our organisation. You can read even more about what our customers think of the services we provide over on our testimonial page. Read more

Graphic Design Around the World

How Graphic Design Differs Around the World 

Why would you need a multilingual design studio, anyway? As long as the words on your documents are translated correctly, shouldn’t that be good enough?

Well, no. Not always, especially for ads, marketing materials, and other visually intensive content. Earlier this week, we looked at some reasons why multilingual typesetting is harder than it seems. But getting the words to look right on the page is only part of the puzzle. You might think that good design is universal, but what makes a “good” graphic design in the UK won’t necessarily resonate with your audience in Japan.

With that in mind, let’s a took at some of the ways graphic design differs around the world:

Graphic Design in Japan and Asia

In the West, we tend to think of the Japanese as the original minimalists. However, graphic design in modern-day Japan is often anything but minimalist. Japanese consumers tend to favor designs with bright colors and bold brushstrokes.  Circles and flowers are common motifs, and cute mascots are a common way for businesses to make themselves more relatable to their customers.

Japanese design is also frequently “information dense.” This tendency is especially notable when it comes to websites. Japanese websites often seem cluttered and “dated” to Western eyes, but as Rich Mirocco explains on the Canva Design school blog,

“(In Japan), details are a welcome aspect of communication and therefore web design too, as a website conveys information and sells the company and its products in place of a live salesperson.”

Many of these traits are also considered desirable in China and South Korea. In China,  Website Magazine  notes that

Chinese sites tend to be divided into many independent spaces, while on western style sites the layout is arranged around a focal point on a page. This is dictated by cultural norms around displaying and consuming information, with China more used to browsing rather than focusing.

Read more

Audio Transcribers at MK Job Show

K International at the MK Job Show

We are recruiting and training a team of Audio Transcribers to join our busy transcription operation. You can come and talk to our team on stand 128 at the MK Job Show on Friday 27th and Saturday the 28th of January in thecentre:mk. We would love to meet interested candidates and we’ll have experts on hand to provide all the information you need about our free audio transcription training opportunities.  Read more

5 Reasons Multilingual Typesetting Is Harder Than You Think

You’ve no doubt heard the saying “A picture is worth a thousand words.” But how does that apply to translation? To put it simply, words aren’t the only thing that can get lost in translation. Without special precautions, the visual impact of your content can easily get lost in the shuffle.

For example, international typesetting is trickier than it might initially seem to the uninitiated. However, ignoring its complexities can make your translations look unprofessional or even unreadable.  Here are 5 reasons multilingual typesetting is harder than you think:

Multilingual Typesetting Pitfall #1: Formatting

Text formatting conventions can vary between languages, even languages that are closely related. Here are some of the most common pitfalls:

  • Hyphenation and line breaks: Different languages have different rules about if, when and where you can use hyphens. For example, there are no hyphens in Arabic.  English allows them in a variety of circumstances, although grammar experts and organisations disagree on the particulars. German, on the other hand, allows hyphens, but only in certain locations. And then there are languages like Thai, which don’t have spaces in between words but do have rules about where the next line can begin.
  • Text Direction: In English, of course, we read from left to right. But that’s not true for all languages. In Arabic, Hebrew and Persian, text is written (and read) from right to left. This might mean you need to reverse the entire layout of your document. And what if there is some Latin text embedded in the document and left untranslated? That can get really interesting!
  • Numbers: Different countries write numbers in different ways, too. For example, some countries use a comma where we would use a decimal point, and vice versa.
  • Alignment: Standards for how to align text also vary from language to language. For example, in Chinese, it’s important that text is aligned precisely and justified on both sides, if possible. Meanwhile, Arabic is almost never aligned to the left.

Read more

A Typesetting Glossary

The Language of Typesetting: A Short Glossary

Multilingual typesetting can sound like a daunting prospect, especially if you are not familiar with the industry lingo. While you don’t have to be an expert to get your publication on the shelves (physical or digital), it would be beneficial to have a working understanding of the terms you are likely to hear when discussing your project with industry specialists. You are likely to encounter many of these terms in design software and when talking to designers, printers and typesetters.

To avoid some of the confusion that may occur while discussing typesetting foreign languages, make sure you understand the whole process and the terminology that’s often involved. Let us get you started with 50 words that will help you navigate the journey to publishing your documents in any language. Read more

transcription services for the vulnerable

The Vital Ways Transcription Services Help Improve the Lives of the World’s Most Vulnerable People

Headlines around the world have been dominated by the humanitarian crisis provoked by the sheer numbers of refugees fleeing war and conflict in Syria, Iraq, Libya and Afghanistan.

As governments and NGOs try to work together to manage the situation at every stage, rapid, accurate and reliable transcription services enable authorities to share information gathered, collect information about the situation on the ground, and deliver international aid as effectively as possible.

Whether this is achieved by transcription of local investigations, through transcribed video or voice interviews, or by sharing transcribed minutes of meetings or conferences, accurate, reliable and secure transcription helps governments to make informed decisions that positively impact the lives of refugees.

Reliable multilingual transcription is particularly valuable, as it enables government departments and NGOs to work in partnership internationally, allowing them to understand the experiences of refugees and aid workers. Transcribed materials such as videos and interview notes can be vital to effectively train staff to meet the emotional, cultural and material needs of refugees. At the same time, these valuable resources help governments and NGOs to communicate the reality of the situation to a much wider audience, gaining greater public support. Read more

merry christmas 2016

Merry Christmas 2016

As another year draws to a close, we’d like to take this opportunity to thank all of our readers & everyone we’ve worked with in 2016. It’s been an exciting year for us at K International and we couldn’t have done it without such great clients and all the exceptional linguists that worked with us. We look forward to building new partnerships throughout the New Year and continuing our commitment to delivering the best services in the industry.

 

We wish you all a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Enjoy the Holidays!

Read more

multilingual transcription helping fight climate change

Multilingual Transcription: Helping Fight Climate Change

It came out of the blue. A crack in the ice and then a surge of water rushing at 400m3 per second down the slopes of the high Andes towards the remote village of Keara in Bolivia. The sudden flood swept away crops, farm animals and pets, but spared the human population on the whole. The surge also destroyed the only road, leaving survivors cut off for several months. But what caused this unexpected disaster?

Helping to Prevent Disaster

Known as the Apolobamba glacial outburst flood of 2009, it was the direct result of climate change. As glaciers in the Bolivian Andes recede (they have shrunk by 43% since the 1980s), meltwater forms lakes on loose piles of sediment that can prove unstable. If a rock or ice avalanche disturbs the lake waters, deadly floods can kill those living in the valleys below. Perhaps surprisingly, multilingual transcription can be an effective tool in helping prevent such climate disasters. Read more

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