"Cześć, jestem z Anglii."

If you can understand that, chances are you are one of the 540,000 speakers of England’s new official second language. That’s right, Polish, has overtaken Punjabi according to the results of the 2011 Census carried out by the Office of National Statistics.

According to  the institute for Public Policy Research this result underlines the growth in the Polish community, and can be seen as a success story for immigration with the majority integrating into the country very smoothly.
The highest proportion of Polish speakers can be found in Ealing, West London, with 6% of the population claiming it as their first language. Conversely Redcar and Cleveland have the lowest percentage, with 99% being native English speakers.

Overall, London still holds the top spot for multiculturalism, with 22% of those filling out the census saying English was not their first language. Newham on the other hand has the highest percentage of non-native, English speakers at 41%.

English, is still fairly common though, with a mere 49,808,000 speakers 😉 It’s also influencing some words in Polish. Here are the top five Ponglims as noted by one of our specialist in-house Polish project managers, Konrad Krzysztofik

  • iść na urlop (to go on vacation) is now: brać holideja (to take holidays)
  • Poles say ‘metro’, but the one in London is tuba 🙂
  • for a ‘drugie śniadanie’: lancz (formerly known as: second breakfast) you’d eat cziken (formerly: kurczak)
  • you no longer complain about korki (jams) but moan about trafik

Oh, I almost forgot, the title of this post means “Hi, I’m from England”,  now you know.

If you need a Polish translation service that you can rely on, we are here for you!

Via Metro, UK

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