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The Different Types of English

Who invented the English language? This is a question that is just as complicated and diverse as the language itself. In truth, English can be considered one of the few “melting pot” languages of the world. With far-ranging roots including (but not limited to) Germanic, Dutch, Latin, Old Norman, French and even ancient Greek. It should come as no surprise that English offers an interesting insight into the past.

However, we also need to realise that different regions of the world speak entirely different dialects while the exact same words will have entirely different definitions in regards to where we live. Believe it or not we do localise (or should that be localize) texts for different ‘English’ speaking markets, this is part of our Transcreation Service. Let me show you what I mean and take a look at some examples that will leave you tongue tied at the end of this article.

The USA Vs the UK

Let’s assume that a British citizen is visiting the states and needs some repair work done on their car. Strutting into a garage and asking the employee to take a look under the bonnet would be quite confusing. “Bonnet” is the head covering for an infant. “Hood” refers to a vehicle. Still, the laughs don’t stop here. Many an American has found himself red in the face after referring to his trousers as “pants”. Suddenly, privacy seems to have been thrown out the window. In the same way, an English woman would never be caught dead wearing a “fanny pack” around town for obvious reasons! I blogged about this a couple of weeks ago on the Association of Language Companies’ blog, the link is here – US and UK EnglishRead more

English Across the Pond

English: Across the Pond.

When you consider the differences between the United States and Britain, it’s not hard to conclude that they are, ultimately, much the same. While there is 3,000 or so miles separating these tiny Isles in Northern Europe from the vast continent of the North Americas physically, it’s merely a drop in the ocean in most ways. Read more

5 Ways Americans Have Ruined The English Language

July 4th is Independence Day in America. It’s been 241 years since that bunch of ungrateful colonists declared independence. You’d think we’d have learned to speak English properly by now.

Yeah, not so much. Here are 5 ways Americans are ruining the English language:

Incorrect Spellings

Americans have long been guilty of spelling abuse.  Thanks to 19th-century reformer Noah Webster,  we’ve dropped the original and proper “u” from words like “colour” and “favour.” And we’ve lost the “a” from words like “orthopaedics”.

But we’ll add these missing letters back at random, whenever we want to appear more sophisticated.

Come on, America, was it really that hard to write one extra letter?

Totesing

totesing

Get off my lawn!

Apparently, the answer to that last question is “yes.” Yes, it is.  Now, don’t get me wrong. Abbreviations have always been a part of how the English language evolves.  For example, consider words like “fab,” “babe” and “delish.”

But these kids today, man! They’ ve taken it to a new, and frankly ridiculous extreme. Or perhaps that should be “ridic.” Anyway, “words” like “obvi” (obviously) and “spesh” (special) appear to be taking over English, part of a trend some linguists have dubbed “totesing.”

This trend has spread to English-speaking millennials around the world, but at least one linguist who studies the phenomenon blames America for it. More specifically, California. Researcher Sravana Reddy told NRP that “It might have originated in that area and spread over because of Hollywood and TV.”

And as much as “obvi” makes me want to scream “Get off my lawn!”, apparently, the current wave of crazy-making abbreviations may have started with “hella.” Which means that younger me was part of the problem. Read more

British English is diverging from American English

The world may be getting smaller, but the distance between the Queen’s English and the American version is actually growing. A new study by the British library shows that “British English is diverging from American English,” library curator Jonnie Robinson told the Guardian.

As part of the study, researchers are having Brits and Americans pronounce a set of 6 different words, many of which, like “schedule,” are traditionally pronounced differently depending on which side of the Atlantic you’re on. Read more