Posts

Improving Efficiency without Sacrificing Quality

A Guide to the Medical Translation Process

For medical translation projects, there are two competing concerns: efficiency and quality. Clients want a fast turnaround for as little money as possible, but the life-or-death nature of medical translation makes even minor errors unacceptable. How can we design a medical translation process that minimizes time and cost to the client, yet still meets regulatory standards and ensures accuracy?

Balancing these goals takes careful consideration and planning during each stage of the medical translation project. No computer program can ensure your message comes across clearly and accurately as well as a skilled human translator can, but using technology appropriately at each stage can streamline the process.

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Translation at the Pharmacy Show

Come and see us at the Pharmacy Show

We are attending the 2014 Pharmacy Show at the NEC in Birmingham on the 5th and 6th of October, that’s this weekend. We’ll be able to show you the benefits of providing your pharmaceutical content in different languages and how it helps you to reach a much wider audience of potential customers.

For more information, access to our pharmaceutical translation brochure and where to find our stand, just click here:

Visitors to our stand can also register their details with our team to receive 10% off their first translation order.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Regulation Information for Medical Translation

Medical Translation Regulations

Medical translation is serious business. Mistakes can be a matter of life or death. As such, medical translation is one of the most heavily regulated segments of the translation industry.

Translation vendors and clients alike must navigate a complex labyrinth of rules at the local, national and international levels in order to stay compliant. Regulations govern what material must be translated, how data is transmitted and stored and the translation process itself.

Medical translation requirements can vary greatly depending on the product in question and the target markets. In most markets you need to have public-facing documents such as patient information sheets, marketing materials and forms for clinical trials translated into the local language. You may need to translate into minority languages, as well. Most of the time, material aimed at healthcare professionals must be translated, too, along with patent applications and applications for regulatory approval. Read more