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retail translation services
FIC regulation: Lost in translation?

Our CEO, Richard Brooks was recently interviewed by Caroline Scott-Thomas for foodnavigator.com. They discuss the challenges faced by food retailers when implementing the new FIC regulations and how quality translation is key to delivering information that meets the requirements set out in the legislation.

Pan-European food companies could be prone to major translation blunders as they look to implement new food labelling rules, says translation expert Richard Brooks.

You can read the entire article by pressing the button below

Translating for retail

Translating for Retail

With the advent of modern technology and having found ourselves fully within the communications revolution, the world is becoming an increasingly small place.

Companies which at one time conducted business transactions across town are now striving to reach customers across the globe. Rapidly growing economies such as China, India and the Middle East are now pivotal players on the world stage. As they develop and open up new opportunities exist for entrepreneurial firms to maximise their returns in these exciting new markets. This is especially true for the retail sector where new customers and partner relationships can be created relatively quickly online.

Would you cross the street?Combining this with an environment at home that has seen an unprecedented amount of competition (due in part to a prolonged recession), the continued growth of retailers exist in international opportunities. Anyone from the retail world understands that clear consistent customer communication and customer service are two of the most critical success factors. Do them wrong and you run the risk of irreversibly destroying brand value. Do them right and you can build a lovemark, a brand built up on love and respect. Read more

Translating Fast Fashion

We recently developed a solution for a very large European retailer to help them to localise/translate all of their packaging for their dynamic range of clothing.

The challenge in this space is to provide translation that is ‘on trend’, error free and makes best use of all the previously translated material, which helps to dramatically lower the unit cost per word to translate. When we reviewed the existing translation solution we found that the translation was being stored on a shared excel sheet in head office.

The theory was great, if they’d translated something once then that translation could be re-used for future packaging at (virtually) zero cost. But in practice it meant that no one was responsible for the data and the spreadsheet had to be emailed around people outside of the ‘loop’. Comments and suggestions were not imported into the master list, the context of the translation was often wrong and the quality of the translation never really improved over time. Read more

vogue the language of fashion

Vogue: The Language of Fashion

Almost two centuries ago, in 1892, Arthur Turnure came up with a great idea and decided to publish a weekly newspaper in the United States named Vogue, little did he know that Vogue would go on to become perhaps the world’s definitive fashion publication. In this article, you’ll find out how Vogue began and went on to successfully leverage language, advertising and regional targeting to ensure its brand is recognised around the world. 2016 marks Vogue’s debut in one of the few regions it has yet to conquer and there’s no sign of it’s international influence dwindling in future, read on to discover more. Read more

Translation at Explore Export

2014 marks the 7th ExploreExport event organised by the UK trade & Investment authority. It’s shaping up to be a grand exhibition, taking place between the 7th and 14th of November in cities around the country, including Newcastle, Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburg and London. It is the largest event of its kind, with 130 UKTI Commercial Officers, British Chamber of Commerce representatives from 80 countries and hundreds of business delegates, all gathered together to discuss export matters.

This year’s theme is “Putting your business in touch with global opportunities” and “Recession is over, time to grow!”. With an increasing number of articles circulating in the business press detailing the positive returns for international export, from Forbes Ten Reasons To Invest In Sri Lanka, The Economic Times Japanese company Tama Home to build houses in India in JV and the Telegraph`s Marks & Spencer plans massive international expansion to name only a few, it is very easy to get inspired and excited about developing business in new markets. It seems like the time is perfect for businesses to start investing in new markets, before they saturate.

Professional translation is a crucial factor to building your brand abroad and helps you to engage with your new customers. K International not only helps businesses get their products on shelves in new regions, but also supports all their linguistic requirements along the way. Our processes simplify the creation of multilingual packaging and integrate closely with regulatory bodies to make sure everything is legally compliant for the target country.

Our goal is to help you understand your customers even better through detailed overseas market research.  We are regular attendees of major industry events from The World Retail Congress, UK Trade & Investment conferences, Britain Means Business to various business development exhibitions to ensure we keep up to date with the latest developments.  We are as passionate about E- Commerce, Bricks and Mortar and packaging as we are about delivering an excellent quality translation service.

With clients like Marks and Spencer, Tesco`s, Wizzair, Ebay, Amazon and the UK Government, we have bags of experience and can work with you to help you achieve international success.

I will be attending the ExploreExport 2014 in London on the 11th of November and will be more than happy to discuss your plans to expand and how we can help. Follow me on twitter, I’ll be happy to meet up.

Wherever you go, you must excel in communication to make an impact.

Meet Aga at Explore Export

Google Translate

Can’t I just use Google Translate?

I was asked this question today.

It wasn’t the first time. If I’m honest, it annoyed me that I should have to answer it at all. But I guess if you don’t work in the language industry, you might perceive Google as a trustworthy company who can do no wrong, so you could be forgiven for thinking that their machine translation would be equally reliable. I’m answering it here on the language blog, to share with anyone who may be guilty of having the same thoughts.

It’s surprising (to me, at least) how many times I hear things like;

  • So basically you do the same as Google Translate?
  • Why should I pay you anything when I can get Google Translate to do it for free?
  • Do you use Google Translate for all your translation?
  • Do you just have one big computer who does all the translation?

(the answer is NO to all of the above) Read more

Avoiding Poor Sales due to Flawed Label Translation

Avoiding Poor Sales due to Flawed Label Translation

This is a guest post from the team over at Globalvision Inc. They produce specialised software solutions for managing the packaging creation and artwork process.

As global sales opportunities continue to increase, in part due to the growth trend of emerging markets, companies continue to benefit from investing in international advertising and product exports. As well as adhering to packaging quality control regulations, which are often not clearly defined in developing countries; companies have to pay attention when adapting their offerings to the cultural and social customs of their international customers, as well as language use and verbal expressions. This is an extremely important factor when it comes to both branding and label translation.

Famous brands such as Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Milka, and The American Dairy Association have all learned about this the hard way. Due to an inadequate translation process and careless research, these companies have all suffered huge product recalls and sales losses at some point in their localisation history.

So, new brands hitting the global market should learn from the lessons the big guys taught us, instead of trying to promote and sell brands and products as you would within a domestic market, it is imperative to understand the cultural differences between countries that tend to prevent this from being a successful strategy. Read more

Agnieszka-Animucka-World-Retail-Congress

Translating The World Retail Congress

One of the biggest retail events of the year takes place in Paris on the 29th September – 01 October 2014, it is the World Retail Congress. This year the theme is “Retailing in a disrupted world”. As retail faces new challenges with new technology “disrupting” the old ways of shopping and consumers behave differently, business models and strategies need to reflect this. This is especially true in my world of internationalisation and translation.

As some of you know K international works with some large retailers (like Tesco and M&S), helping them to put their products on shelves all over the world by providing a language translation service specifically tailored to the retail sector. If you are an emerging retailer and look to expand into new markets, we have the experience and knowledge to assist you in your journey. If you are already established in new markets we can work with you to improve the translation and artwork processes to smoothly run your linguistic operations. We supply a quality retail translation service starting with product specification and description and finishing on translation of your technology solutions. At all times we work along side our clients and in line with their brand message. Read more

Packaging regulation after Brexit

Translating packaging in a post-Brexit regulatory environment

After a stormy few weeks, the dust following the UK’s vote for Brexit is starting to settle. However, with the form that Brexit will actually take still unclear and much wrangling over the TTIP deal with the US still ahead, international trade is facing a period of uncertainty.  For industries as diverse as food and drink, pharmaceuticals and cars, this lack of confidence in what the future holds is affecting investment and, naturally, feeds into business decisions on launching products into international markets. Read more

The Secret to International Retail

The eCommerce Futures Conference recently brought together speakers from the likes of fashion retailers Coast and Hobbs and pure-plays such as sex toy specialist Lovehoney to discuss their latest endeavours in international expansion.

Matt Curry, head of eCommerce at Lovehoney, said that for eCommerce operations to work successfully in new territories it is important to “do the stuff a start-up would do”. Established retailers, he said, should not be afraid of looking at the basics of retailing when entering foreign markets such as are you communicating with your customers in their language.

Before you commit yourself to expanding into a foreign country, you must test the market. Travel to the country, hire a local expert and visit similar businesses and companies, try and get a feel for the tacit knowledge. Make sure that your business model will survive and even thrive in this new place and be certain that you are fully aware of any cultural differences between your way of life and your chosen country. Read more