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The Language of Content Strategy

It is always a buzz seeing your work in print and today I got that special feeling.

My copy of The Language of Content Strategy arrived in the post, all the way from San Francisco. For those who don’t know the project was put together by Rahel Anne Bailie and Scott Abel and is described as the ‘gateway to a language that describes the world of content strategy’. It contains contribution from 52 experts from all over the world of content creation (me being one!) and covers all sorts of topics. Its vital reading for anyone in the content/publishing world.

I got mine for free! but you can guy yours from Amazon or Barnes & Nobel.

 

Multilingual Search Trends in 2014

Multilingual Search in 2014

Here’s a quick synopsis of some of things were working on with our clients and some trends we’re seeing continuing in 2014. Hopefully you’ll be able to use it and it’ll help you to get the highest return for your investment in Multilingual Search.

Growth in International Mobile Search

multilingual search - online ad spend in the USIn the US last year the percentage of people using the internet via smartphone was up from 56% at the start of the year to 65% at the end, that’s a growth of 16%. Over half of these people (52%) used Android while 41% used iOS. Great news for Google as 5 of their apps (youtube, gmail, maps, search, play) are all in the top ten and have shown double digit growth for the year (Facebook remains at #1). eMarketer claim that “spending on desktop advertising will increase by just 0.41%, while mobile ad spending will grow a further 56.00% to $14.97 billion”. Mobile advertising will generate more revenue in 2017 for the first year than its desktop counterpart (see chart).

This metric is growing even faster outside of the US. Chinese consumers bought twice as many smart phones in 2013 than the year before. Apple hides its market share data in China but we think its between 15-20%. Android has over 75% making it the clear market leader.

As the world moves away from a traditional desktop model, to one based on an app on a smartphone, the traffic attracted to your own website will mirror this (for the first year our own site now has had more mobile visits than desktop). Your customer acquisition and retention strategies (whatever region you are operating in) will need to change to reflect this. More of your marketing budget needs to be assigned to app development and how your site’s content will look/behave on a mobile device. The roll-out of 4G/5G networks in developing economies is a lot faster than putting cable underground. Read more

Multilingual SEO

Multilingual SEO

If you’re a native English speaker, then you may believe that the internet is dominated by the English language. Almost all of the computer code, social networking, e-commerce and news sites that are most popular with English speakers were developed in the English-speaking world, and they mesh seamlessly with the language. However, while slightly more than half the web’s content is still written in English, that won’t be true for long. Only around a quarter of internet users have English as their primary language and internet usage of this demographic is growing at a much faster rate.

Most people require or prefer web content that’s written in their native language. For international businesses to really engage with customers they need to have versions of their websites written in each of the languages their customers speak. In some parts of the world, even local businesses have to engage with more than one language group. Read more

Google Penalizes Bad Machine Translation

& 10 tips for good international SEO

Planning to translate your business website into another language? Free, automatic translation tools like Google Translate might seem tempting, but here’s one more reason to avoid relying on them: Google doesn’t like it. And if Google doesn’t like it, you’d better not do it, at least not if you value your website traffic.

It seems odd that the search engine gods would issue penalties for using Google’s own product, but apparently search engine spammers have been publishing lots of awkward, error-laden machine translated content.  To keep their results as accurate as possible, Google classifies automatically translated content as “automatically generated content,” which violates their webmaster guidelines.

That means that poorly translated content could seriously impact your rankings.  Also,  as Ariel Hochstadt pointed out in Search Engine Land, if you’ve monetized your site using AdSense, your account could be disabled for including “websites with gibberish content that makes no sense or seems auto-generated.”

Ironically, Google itself has started using automatically generated content on its own properties, like the Google Play store. However, as Search Engine Land points out, it appears that Google is using some sort of new and improved Google Translate that’s not available to the general public.

Why not release the latest and greatest Translate tool? Hochstadt speculates:

My best bet is that Google is afraid of mass spamming that could be hard to identify. Nevertheless, if they think it is good enough for them to publish it on their Android and Chrome stores, why wouldn’t they allow others to do the same in Google Translate? Knowing Google, you probably are aware that their rules sometimes oblige us, but don’t apply to those located in Mountain View.

Fair or not, you’re better off using a professional translator, or at the very least having the final product reviewed by someone who is fluent in your target language and able to correct any mistakes. To help you out and keep you the right side of the Google police, we have put together a collection of 10 International SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) tips that you can employ to help boost the performance of your multilingual site. Read more