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The difference between Marketing translation and Transcreation

Marketing Translation Vs. Transcreation: What’s the Difference?

Many companies devote energy, time and money into developing their marketing collateral, but tend to do so purely with a domestic audience in mind. When it comes to presenting your brand to new markets overseas, the cultural and linguistic barriers can seem rather daunting but they are imperative considerations if your international campaign is to be a success. This is precisely why professional marketing translation and transcreation services exist.

What is transcreation?

Transcreation is best summed up as creative international advertising translation. The act of Transcreation itself refers to a message being presented in another language in a way that has been moulded to suit a new audience. Specifically used with a marketing focus, the idea is to elicit the same emotions, wants and needs in the new audience as were intended for the domestic audience of the original message. This can involve the creation of new imagery, branding and copy. These alterations remain true to the spirit of the original (though they may differ greatly in appearance) and produce the same end result (usually, making the audience want to buy the product in question).

A variety of other terms are used to refer to transcreation. These include creative translation, international copy adaptation, cultural adaptation and cross-market copywriting. Read more

International marketing – adverts on a train line

7 International Marketing Campaigns That Failed to Translate

We’re inundated with marketing campaigns every hour of every day – from billboard advertisements to events and the articles we read. But there’s a fine line between a campaign that succeeds and a campaign that fails to resonate with its intended audience.

Companies will often spend millions on marketing, with even the tiniest details (such as phrases and hair colour) carefully considered.

The problem comes when a brand decides to expand internationally and fails to carefully adapt its messaging for an international audience. At the very least this is likely to result in an unsuccessful campaign. But in many cases it can result in a hugely damaging (if sometimes quite amusing) cultural blunder. Read more

Translating a brand - china vs the world

Translating a Brand: China vs. the World

When it comes to cultural and linguistic differences, few regions stand as far apart as China and the Western world – the US in particular. One is a communist state that prioritises cooperation and collectivism, the other a democracy that sees itself as a paragon of meritocracy. While both may fall short of their ideals (which country in this world can truly live up to its values across all parts of its society?), this does not change the vast differences between their fundamental principles.

When it comes to population size, China dwarfs the US, with 1.38 billion citizens, versus just 326 million in the US. Nevertheless, the US reigns supreme when it comes to GDP – at least for the moment. The US economy is worth $18.5 trillion, accounting for 24.5% of gross world product. China has the second largest global economy, at $11.3 trillion.

Linguistically, too, China and the West are very different. Mandarin, is a tonal, analytic language that uses a subject-verb-object word order and topic-prominent organisation. It is written using logograms known as hànzì. The English language, on the other hand, is a Germanic language that uses a Latin script, modal verbs and the palatalisation of consonants, though it does share the subject-verb-object order of Mandarin.  Read more

French Idioms

French Idioms

French Idioms and their English Equivalents

An idiom is an expression whose meaning cannot be deduced from the literal definitions of the words that make up the expression. In other words you couldn’t look up the meaning of each word in a dictionary and comprehend the meaning of the sentence.

Idioms are often deeply ingrained into our culture, going back many generations and used without thinking. Idioms are often funny when taken out of context or spoken to a student of English (who will have no choice but to take the meaning literally). “It’s raining cats and dogs” does not mean that there are cats and dogs falling out of the sky. This makes idioms very hard to translate and represent effectively in a foreign language.

To illustrate how funny idioms can be we have prepared a list of French Idioms and their English equivalents below.

If you have a translation project that involves the use of idioms or colloquialisms please highlight their use in the source text before sending them to K International. We offer a transcreation service that will allows us to re-engineer the text making it suitable for the market in which it is intended for, in other words we will not translate “it’s raining cats and dogs” literally we’ll use ‘Il pleut des cordes’ if the text is for the French speaking market in France.

French Idiom
(English Translation)
English Equivalent
Il pleut des cordes
(it’s raining ropes)
I’s raining cats and dogs
Avoir une dent contre quelqu’un
(to have a tooth against someone)
To have a grudge against someone
C’est la fin des haricots!
(It’s the end of the beans)
That’s the last straw
Chercher midi à quatorze heures
(To look for midday at 2pm)
To over complicate things
Etre trempé jusqu’aux os
(To be soaked to the bones)
To be soaked to the skin
Faire choux blanc
(to make white cabbage)
To draw a blank
Faire d’une pierre deux coups
(To hit twice with the same stone)
To kill two birds with one stone
Panne d’oreiller
(pillow failure)
To sleep in (usually when you are late for work / an appointment)
Se noyer dans un verre d’eau
(To drown in a glass of water)
To make a mountain out of a molehill
tirer les plans sur la comète
(to draw up plans on the comet)
To count one’s chickens before they’ve hatched
Voir 36 chandelles
(to see 36 candles)
To see stars
Vouloir le beurre et l’argent du beurre
(To want the butter and the money for the butter)
To want your cake and eat it too
A Typesetting Glossary

The Language of Typesetting: A Short Glossary

Multilingual typesetting can sound like a daunting prospect, especially if you are not familiar with the industry lingo. While you don’t have to be an expert to get your publication on the shelves (physical or digital), it would be beneficial to have a working understanding of the terms you are likely to hear when discussing your project with industry specialists. You are likely to encounter many of these terms in design software and when talking to designers, printers and typesetters.

To avoid some of the confusion that may occur while discussing typesetting foreign languages, make sure you understand the whole process and the terminology that’s often involved. Let us get you started with 50 words that will help you navigate the journey to publishing your documents in any language. Read more

Packaging localisation for Glorious Foods

Glorious Day for Soup!

We’ve been working on a great deal of food packaging translation projects in the last few years. Helping some of the UK’s largest supermarkets and food providers gear their products for sale abroad is no small task. Large scale EU regulatory changes called the FIR are coming into force and are certainly keeping our translation teams uber busy.

One of our most recent clients Glorious Foods, really brightened the office today when 3 massive refrigeration boxes arrived filled with all manner of luxury soups and sauces. Glorious pride themselves on producing food containing bold and unexpected flavours, just looking at their product descriptions immediately shows off their passion. Translating this passion is a creative challenge for our linguists, but without doubt a very rewarding one too.

Localising product descriptions

 

Needless to say our team were eager to sample the produce, you know to ensure our translations properly reflect the quality of the product… so in the name of education, each pot was rapidly assigned a name tag and stowed till lunch (for the most part, some of the team skipped breakfast apparently). Our office fridge now looks like it would feel right at home in a shared student flat 🙂

Translating food packaging for Glorious Foodsfood packaging for Glorious Foods

Big thanks again to the team at Glorious, you might just be our new favourites 😉

Take a look at their wonderful range of products over on their site www.gloriousfoods.co.uk

 

…now where’s that spoon?