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Free Translation of Merry Christmas

Every year we get asked to supply the translation for ‘Merry Christmas’ (people like to put it in their Christmas cards). To make this year a truly multilingual festive season we have included the most popular languages below.

Translation of Merry Christmas

Merry Christmas in Chinese Simplified: 圣诞快乐
Merry Christmas in Chinese Traditional: 聖誕快樂
Merry Christmas in French: Joyeux Noël
Merry Christmas in Hindi: क्रिसमस मुबारक
Merry Christmas in Hungarian: Boldog karácsonyt
Merry Christmas in Irish Gaelic:
Nollaig shona dhuit” (singular) “Nollaig shona daoibh” (plural)
Merry Christmas in Italian: Buon Natale
Merry Christmas in Japanese: メリークリスマス
Merry Christmas in Lingala: Mbotama Malamu
Merry Christmas in Polish: Wesołych Świąt Bożego Narodzenia
Merry Christmas in Punjabi:ਕ੍ਰਿਸਮਸ ਦੀਆਂ ਮੁਬਾਰਕਾਂ
Merry Christmas in Russian: С Рождеством!
Merry Christmas in Somali: Kirismas Wacan
Merry Christmas in Spanish: Feliz Navidad
Merry Christmas in Welsh: Nadolig Llawen

or if you prefer…

Translation of Seasons’ Greetings

Seasons’ Greetings in Chinese Simplified: 顺颂时祺
Seasons’ Greetings in Chinese Traditional: 致以季節的問候
Seasons’ Greetings in French: Meilleurs vœux
Seasons’ Greetings in Hindi: हार्दिक शुभ कामनाएँ
Seasons’ Greetings in Hungarian: Kellemes ünnepeket kívánunk
Seasons’ Greetings in Irish Gaelic: “Beannachtaí an tSéasúir”
Seasons’ Greetings in Italian: Buone Feste
Seasons’ Greetings in Japanese: 季節のご挨拶
Seasons’ Greetings in Lingala: Mbote ya esengo na mikolo ya kopema
Seasons’ Greetings in Polish: Wesołych Świąt
Seasons’ Greetings in Punjabi: ਹਾਰਦਿਕ ਸ਼ੁਭ ਕਾਮਨਾਵਾਂ
Seasons’ Greetings in Russian: С праздником!
Seasons’ Greetings in Somali: Salaamaha Xiliyadaha
Seasons’ Greetings in Spanish: Felices Fiestas
Seasons’ Greetings in Welsh: Cyfarchion y Tymor

One last thing…

May we wish all readers of K International Blog a very Merry Christmas and a prosperous New Year 🙂

northern-Ireland

Schools in Irish Translation Debate

The 11-plus examination is the entrance test for Grammar Schools. In Northern Ireland they are debating as to whether or not an Irish translation of the exam should be provided.

According to the BBC an Irish language education body has requested that all schools provide suitable translations for the test so that it is fair.

Comhairle na Gaelscolaíochta who are the representative body for Irish-medium education in Northern Ireland has written to schools about this matter.

The BBC quote spokesman Seán Ó Coinn as saying ‘parents could remove their children from Irish language schools or take legal action if a suitable translation was not available.’

“We’re unclear what the implications might be, and it very much depends on how parents react,” he said.

When last years 11-plus Grammar school tests took place, 150 out of 327 students sat the Irish version.

It is so important that we provide translation for all just because a pupil speaks both English and Irish doesn’t mean they are comfortably taking such an important test in English, they may feel more confident in doing the test in Irish if it is their first language.

The Welsh Assembly Government work very hard to ensure that Welsh translations are available for all in business and education, the Northern Ireland Government should be doing the same.

President Obama

President Obama in Controversy over Healthcare Translation Policy

Accoring to various news reports there is controversy in the USA this week over ‘ObamaCare’ policies which state proposed healthcare reform plans which include providing on site interpreters for patients who have limited English. The healthcare reform legislation is currently pending in Congress.

English language advocates are up in arms as this could add a significant increase to the cost of healthcare in the USA and they believe it will discourage foreign immigrants from learning English. Surely, in today’s multicultural society the provision of translation services to medical institutions is essential.

America needs to look at itself and its history to see that America was made what it is today by foreign settlers who didn’t all speak English and certainly not American English!

Have some respect for your history and accept the fact that not everyone speaks English. The Spanish for example were one of the first European settlers in the US in 1513. Surely they have a right to speak Spanish if they wish to do so. America is meant to be the ‘Land of the Free’ after all.

Yes it seems logical that if you move to an English speaking country you should learn the lingo but even if you do, when your child is dying in A&E (sorry America suppose that’s ER to you) you may not be able to express what is wrong in your second language. To be sure the patient or their guardian fully understands what is happening it is essential that adequate language translation services are provided.

What Does Your Baby's Name Mean?

Years ago, people stuck, for the most part, with traditional names for their little ones. Now, perhaps inspired by the odd names celebrities tend to choose for their offspring (Moon Unit? Apple? Sparrow?  Moxie CrimeFighter?), many expectant parents spend a lot of time trying to find something unique and special to call their little bundle of joy.

However, a name that is merely “unique” in English could have a totally different, perhaps unwelcome, meaning in another culture. For example, “Suri,” the name of Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes’ daughter, actually means “pickpocket” in Japanese and “soured” in French, according to British translation firm Today Translation. To help soon-to-be parents select an unusual name that travels well, the company is offering a new service: the baby name translation audit. For a one time fee of $1,700, the company will look up the meaning of potential baby names in 100 different languages.

Of course, this service won’t stop sadistic parents from giving their babies embarrassing names for kicks. Even before creating your own baby name from scratch became commonplace, you still had Mr. and Mrs. Head christening their baby boy “Richard,” or Governor Hogg of Texas naming his baby girl “Ima.”

For ordinary parents, $1,700 seems like a lot to pay; even it does help ensure that you aren’t accidentally naming your child “dung beetle” in some other language.

In the New York Daily News, Today Translation’s CEO Jurga Zilinskiene explained why she thinks parents will be willing to pay for the service:

“You’ll rest assured you are picking a good name,” Zilinskiene said. “At the end of the day, it’s something a person has to live with for the rest of their lives.”

What do you think? Would you pay for a baby name translation audit?

Welsh Website Translation

Just a quick update on what’s been going on here at K, especially from the Government Translation Sales Team point of view. As you might not know before, I have been working in close partnership with the Environment Agency now and have been really enjoying it.

Only because I know you are really curious, I will try to explain what we do for them…

Basically, we translated their English website into Welsh back in 2008 (more than 290 000 words!) but since then we have been making sure that we keep everything updated and add any additional information that they require. The translation was completed by professional welsh translators working directly into the Environment Agencies content managment system. This meant that the content was produced as quickly as possible and left our client with a Welsh language website ready for use.

It’s a must that we comply with the Welsh Language Act and in doing so we always do our best to achieve this essential requirement. Check out the images of the English & Welsh website below!

English Version

Read more

Understanding Metaphors

People in every culture use metaphors and other figurative language to express themselves.  For example, in English we say “he is a pig” to indicate someone who is gluttonous or slovenly. What does it mean that we say “pig” instead of, say, “dog?” What does our use of that particular metaphor say about us as a culture?  Does it say anything at all?

The US government believes that it does. According to The Atlantic, the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity is giving out grants as part of a program to “understand how speakers of Farsi, Russian, English, and Spanish see the world by building software that automatically evaluates their use of metaphors.”

The grants could total in the hundreds of millions of dollars. The idea behind the investment is that if you can understand the metaphors people use and how those metaphors affect the way they perceive the world, you can alter the way you present your ideas and proposals so that they are more likely to be accepted. Building a database of metaphors and their meanings also makes it easier to use computers to accurately parse written texts, which is important since the US has a perennial shortage of human translators in certain languages. Read more

Facebook Translates Comments

Facebook already connects hundreds of millions of users around the globe, and the site itself has been translated into more than 70 different languages. Now, it looks like the popular website may take its efforts to break down language barriers between users to another level by offering automatic translations for comments.

At the moment, the feature is only available to some users. When it’s active, it allows users to see translated versions of comments written in an unfamiliar language, as well to switch back and forth between the translation and the original comment. The translation program doesn’t work all the time, but when it does work it is apparently even able to translate some slang terms. So far, it’s been spotted translating Hebrew, French, Spanish, and Chinese. Read more

foreign-language-fonts

Guide to foreign language fonts

In our previous article we talked about the importance of Unicode encoding and how it provides a standard for use of foreign languages with computer systems. This article discusses foreign language fonts and how they are implemented within translated documents to properly represent the characters and text. Read more

Corporate Translation Guide

Translation Guide for Business

Here at K International, we are regularly asked by our clients what is actually involved in translation. There is not really one overall answer to this as it is very much dependent on how you intend to use the results. Some clients appear to see translation as a low cost means of increasing sales or even treat it as a complete after thought, a simple last minute process. With the advent of tools such as Google translate, this notion of a straight forward push button solution seems to be becoming even more embedded into people’s way of thinking. Read more

11 Great Books About Translation 

Are you looking for some good books about translation to add to your holiday reading list? We picked 11 of our favourites from several different genres.  Interested in history? Looking for romance? Suspense? It’s all here, so go get yourself a cup of hot tea and get ready to curl up by the fire!

Found in Translation

Found in Translation

How Language Shapes Our Lives and Transforms the World by Nataly Kelly and Jost Zetzsche

Through a series of carefully chosen anecdotes, industry legends Kelly and Zetzsche show “the surprising and complex ways that translation shapes the world.”

This is a fun read for translation-industry insiders and language geeks alike. It’s smart, but also entertaining and accessible. It’s on the reading list of every localisation sales team I know and there are stories in there which anyone in the language industry can relate to.

If you work in this industry, it’s one of the best books about translation to recommend when people ask “So, what is it you actually do again?” If the translation professional in your life doesn’t have this, I recommend you ask Santa to put it in their stocking this year.

You can buy it on Amazon here.

Lost in Translation

An Illustrated Compendium of Untranslatable Words from Around the World by Ella Frances Sanders

Lost in translationIn this New York Times bestseller, Ella Frances Sanders illustrates more than 50 words without direct English translations.  For example, take the German  Kabelsalat, meaning “a tangle of wires.” Here, it is illustrated by multi-coloured wires, tangled like spaghetti.

Razliubit, a Russian word for the bitter-sweet feeling of falling out of love, is illustrated by the figure of a person tumbling off a giant rose, with rose petals falling all around. It’s a beautiful piece of work.

Available on Amazon here.

Read more