Translation interview for Packaging today
Interview with packaging today

Our business development manager, Clare Daley, was recently interviewed by packaging today, a leading European industry magazine,  about the importance of translation in international packaging. She discusses some of the concerns distributors need to address and tips on avoiding the pitfalls that can sink a packaging translation project. You can read the entire article over at the packaging today site and find out more about our specialist food packaging translation service right here.

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FIC regulation: Lost in translation?

Our CEO, Richard Brooks was recently interviewed by Caroline Scott-Thomas for foodnavigator.com. They discuss the challenges faced by food retailers when implementing the new FIC regulations and how quality translation is key to delivering information that meets the requirements set out in the legislation.

Pan-European food companies could be prone to major translation blunders as they look to implement new food labelling rules, says translation expert Richard Brooks.

You can read the entire article by pressing the button below

Do Animals Have Language?

People have always yearned to be able to “talk” to animals, but scientists have traditionally seen language as a uniquely human attribute. However, the more scientists study animal communication, the more they come away convinced that our language capabilities aren’t that special after all.

In the most recent of these studies, scientists at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis in Knoxville, Tennessee analyzed recordings of vocalizations from several different species, ranging from birds like finches and chickadees to whales and orangutans.

They expected the calls to follow what is called the Markov process, which limits their complexity, in contrast to the flexibility of human language. As head scientist Dr Arik Kershenbaum explained to the Washington Post:

“A Markov process is where you have a sequence of numbers or letters or notes, and the probability of any particular note depends only on the few notes that have come before. What makes human language special is that there’s no finite limit as to what comes next.”

Surprisingly, none of the animal calls analyzed in the study fit the Markovian hypothesis.  In fact, five of the seven species used vocalizations that matched more complex statistical models that are closer to human speech.

Does that mean that animals do have language in the same sense that we do? Not necessarily. But according to Kershenbaum, it does mean we may be able to learn more about the origin of human speech by studying animal vocalizations. As he explained to the Evening Telegraph,

“Language is the biggest difference that separates humans from animals evolutionarily, but multiple studies are finding more and more stepping stones that seem to bridge this gap. Uncovering the process underlying vocal sequence generation in animals may be critical to our understanding of the origin of language.”

If you could choose one animal to talk to, what would it be? And what would you talk about? Let us know in the comments!

Photo Credit:  AttributionShare Alike Some rights reserved by Liam Quinn

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