Word Poverty Hits the UK

The BBC has reported that children in England are to be offered lessons to improve their formal English skills amid fears that British children are suffering from “word poverty”. The question is, just because we don’t use a word frequently does that mean we don’t know it or do we have it in mind but choose to use an alternative? Children often use modern or fashionable words which, for example, their grandmother hasn’t heard of. Just because Grandma doesn’t know it doesn’t mean it’s not a word.

A word exists as long as another person understands what you mean. For example the word bling meaning jewellery, Grandma might not know what it means but the child who sits next to you at school knows what you are talking about.

Global Language Monitor (GLM) a US based company have stated that they believe that the one millionth word will be added to the English language sometime in June 09. New words the GLM have been tracking include Obamamania, bankster and bloggerati.

Children’s vocabulary can vary depending on parental guidance/teaching, geographical location, education and life experiences. For example, a child who excels at reading is likely to have a wide vocabulary as they have had more exposure to words, plus their standard education.

English is one of the main core subjects in schools in the UK; do we really need to give children extra lessons? Also should we not encourage children to develop the English language as our ancestors would have done?

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