Monthly Archives: August 2011

Cuts Threaten Italian Academy‎

Across the globe, government services are being slashed in the name of austerity. In many countries, language services are not exempt from the chopping block– and in Italy, the damage may go so far as to include the Italian language academy itself, the Accademia della Crusca. The academy was e...
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Translation Higher Priority‎

You’re familiar with the phrase “The customer is always right,” right? Unfortunately, when it comes to translation,newresearchfromTransPerfect shows that businesses aren’t taking that advice to heart. The survey examined attitudes towards translation among consumers and executives from acros...
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How Far Would You Go?‎

As babies grow up and develop language skills, they lose the ability to hear and produce sounds that aren’t used in their native language. This typically happens between 8 and 10 months, and it’s one of the things that makes it so difficult to learn a new language as an adult. However, with prac...
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iPhone App Helps Troops

When it comes to Afghanistan, winning the all-important “battle of hearts of minds” has proven to be quite difficult…especially when soldiers don’t speak the language. Now, a new, free iPhone app is available to help soldiers learn Dari, one of the local languages. The app, TripLingoDari...
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Tunica Language Is Resurrected

Before Europeans began to explore what is now the United States, the Tunica people lived in the Mississippi River Valley. They grew maize for food, traded in salt, and built mounds to bury their dead. However, by 1800’s, they were down to less than 100 members living in Marksville, Louisiana. They...
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Twitter: the New Haiku?‎

Twitter, the microblogging social network that limits users to “tweets” of 140 characters or less, is growing across the globe. However, communicating with the world in 140-character bursts has really taken off in Japan, especially after the earthquake and its accompanying tsunami earlier this y...
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Ancient Greek Translation

In 1896, students from Oxford University on backpacking trip stumbled upon a rubbish dump in the ancient Egyptian city of Oxyrhynchus. To modern archaeologists, the contents were about as far from rubbish as you can possibly get: thousands of pieces of Greek papyri, dating back to the period after A...
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