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Translation at Explore Export

2014 marks the 7th ExploreExport event organised by the UK trade & Investment authority. It’s shaping up to be a grand exhibition, taking place between the 7th and 14th of November in cities around the country, including Newcastle, Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburg and London. It is the largest event of its kind, with 130 UKTI Commercial Officers, British Chamber of Commerce representatives from 80 countries and hundreds of business delegates, all gathered together to discuss export matters.

This year’s theme is “Putting your business in touch with global opportunities” and “Recession is over, time to grow!”. With an increasing number of articles circulating in the business press detailing the positive returns for international export, from Forbes Ten Reasons To Invest In Sri Lanka, The Economic Times Japanese company Tama Home to build houses in India in JV and the Telegraph`s Marks & Spencer plans massive international expansion to name only a few, it is very easy to get inspired and excited about developing business in new markets. It seems like the time is perfect for businesses to start investing in new markets, before they saturate.

Professional translation is a crucial factor to building your brand abroad and helps you to engage with your new customers. K International not only helps businesses get their products on shelves in new regions, but also supports all their linguistic requirements along the way. Our processes simplify the creation of multilingual packaging and integrate closely with regulatory bodies to make sure everything is legally compliant for the target country.

Our goal is to help you understand your customers even better through detailed overseas market research.  We are regular attendees of major industry events from The World Retail Congress, UK Trade & Investment conferences, Britain Means Business to various business development exhibitions to ensure we keep up to date with the latest developments.  We are as passionate about E- Commerce, Bricks and Mortar and packaging as we are about delivering an excellent quality translation service.

With clients like Marks and Spencer, Tesco`s, Wizzair, Ebay, Amazon and the UK Government, we have bags of experience and can work with you to help you achieve international success.

I will be attending the ExploreExport 2014 in London on the 11th of November and will be more than happy to discuss your plans to expand and how we can help. Follow me on twitter, I’ll be happy to meet up.

Wherever you go, you must excel in communication to make an impact.

Meet Aga at Explore Export

Infographic: How translators can market themselves online

Infographic: How Translators Can Market Themselves Online

In our field we work with literally 1000’s of translators, sometimes they come to us directly, but often we need to go looking for specialists with linguistic skills in specific areas like document localisation or website translation. It’s here where we noticed a problem, a great many translators aren’t making themselves visible to potential online customers anywhere near as much as they could. Some of the very best translators we have on our books don’t have any kind of online presence, which made us think, maybe we can help.

Being a freelance translator is a competitive business, even more so if you are just starting out. To make sure you have the best chance of getting work in from clients, you absolutely must make sure those clients can find you. More and more people are using the internet to research and buy translation services and you really don’t want to be left behind as this trend shows no sign of slowing. It’s not enough to set up a profile on Proz.com and wait for the jobs to roll in, thousands are already doing exactly that… you need to start taking a proactive approach and make sure potential clients have the best chance of finding you vs. your competition, how do you do that? Well besides being great at what you do, marketing yourself effectively online can help enormously. Read more

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UK business guide to Switzerland

Export Guide for Switzerland

Translation and localisation support plays a major role in a successful export strategy so K International is producing a number of country-specific export guides to provide your business with some helpful information. You can read the introduction and view other guides as they become available right here.

According to the World Economic Forum, Switzerland is the world’s most competitive economy – a position it has held for the past seven years. The maturity and diversity of the Swiss economy present a plethora of business opportunities for UK companies looking to do business in Switzerland. As such, this business culture guide looks at the dos and don’ts of doing business in Switzerland, along with some key details for companies looking to export their products for Swiss consumers.

Read more

Export Guide to Belgium

Export Guide to Belgium

Translation and localisation support plays a major role in a successful export strategy so K International is producing a number of country-specific export guides to provide your business with some helpful information. You can read the introduction and view other guides as they become available right here.

Belgium’s market offers a range of opportunities to UK businesses looking to export their goods and services overseas. This affluent, multicultural country is within easy reach of the UK and offers a highly competitive marketplace for UK exporters. With a population of more than 11 million, the country offers strong purchasing power in an environment that is receptive to UK goods.

This Belgium business culture guide takes an in-depth look at business, linguistic and cultural considerations for companies looking at expanding abroad. Read more

International business expansion - man at airport

Culture Guide for Businesses Expanding Internationally

Every year, hundreds of entrepreneurial companies will consider international expansion as a growth strategy – and with potential rewards including increased revenue and a wider range of customers, why wouldn’t they?

Most of these businesses will know that thorough planning, plentiful finances and accurate translation are central to their success. However, the importance of local culture, as well as the unexpected complications it can cause, is often overlooked.

Here’s why an in-depth understanding of local customs, assumptions and biases should be at the heart of everything you do. Read more

International marketing – adverts on a train line

7 International Marketing Campaigns That Failed to Translate

We’re inundated with marketing campaigns every hour of every day – from billboard advertisements to events and the articles we read. But there’s a fine line between a campaign that succeeds and a campaign that fails to resonate with its intended audience.

Companies will often spend millions on marketing, with even the tiniest details (such as phrases and hair colour) carefully considered.

The problem comes when a brand decides to expand internationally and fails to carefully adapt its messaging for an international audience. At the very least this is likely to result in an unsuccessful campaign. But in many cases it can result in a hugely damaging (if sometimes quite amusing) cultural blunder. Read more

UK Export Guide for Germany

Export Guide for Germany

Translation and localisation support plays a major role in a successful export strategy so K International is producing a number of country-specific export guides to provide your business with some helpful information. You can read the introduction and view other guides as they become available right here.

German businesses have a reputation for innovation and productivity. They are also known for supporting worker progression from the shop floor to senior management, to ensure that those in charge of the company know the business inside out. Germany has used this approach to build financial strength that sees it exporting goods around the world. It is also an important importer of goods from the UK.

This business culture guide is designed to provide UK-based exporters with the facts and figures they need in order to get to grips with this key export market.

Read more

Talking Business: How to Avoid a Translation Fail

Some phrases just don’t translate-especially when you are relying on a computer to do the heavy lifting. The International Trade website has published a list of English business phrases that don’t translate well, and it illustrates this point beautifully.

Take, for example, the common English expression “give me a ballpark figure.” Translated into Russian literally, as a computer would do it, you get “Give to me the diagram of the baseball stadium.” Unless you’re in the baseball stadium construction business, that simply won’t do. In Spanish, “We’ll hit the ground running” turns into a phrase that brings to mind an action movie: “We will strike the earth operation.” The best of the bunch is probably the literal Chinese translation of the phrase “We need to get our ducks in a row.” Once translated, it becomes “We need to obtain our duck continuously.” What?!?!

So, how do you avoid sounding like an idiot when you deal with foreign clients? The best course of action is to avoid machine translation if at all possible-it simply isn’t reliable enough yet. If you do need to use machine translation for a business project, write in simple language, avoiding metaphors, figurative language, jargon and colloquial expressions.

Richard Brooks, General Manager of UK based translation firm K International, has the following advice for UK businesses:

“Idioms are common place in workplaces across Britain and its fine (within reason) to use them in your local marketing activities. The tricky part comes in when you need to translate that message for use in another region.

Computers (at the moment) simply cannot understand the real meaning behind these idioms. For copy, that when translated is intended to convert potentially interested parties into sales revenue then a real human being must be used in the translation process.

For the best results recreating your message for use in another country a service such as transcreation should be used which includes incountry testing and cultural focus groups.

Get it right and you’ll have a winning marketing campaign that will spread like wildfire (excuse the idiom) in the blogs and social media networks, get it wrong and people will think you’re an idiot”

Assuming you have a competent interpreter, human-powered translation is always superior because human interpreters recognize expressions like these and know how to translate them appropriately to convey the correct meaning.

Translating for luxury brands

Localizing Luxury Brands

China is now the world’s second largest consumer of luxury goods (USA is first, Japan is 3rd). As the world economy grows the centre of gravity of the global middle class shifts eastwards, with this shift your customers are changing, managing a luxury brand is not what it used to be.

The key to marketing a luxury brand is the considered and precise use of language to ensure that the target market is reached. Translating existing content with a full appreciation of the colloquial and cultural implications of the text is therefore vital to an effective expansion strategy.

The style and register is always paramount – never more so than when seeking to influence the purchasing intent of foreign markets. After all, if it was as simple as running the words through Google Translate there would be little need for a strategic multi-market plan. Irrespective of the product, service or demographic, in order to effectively promote on a multinational platform, it is therefore vital that the textual content is translated with a complete linguistic understanding of each specific market. Read more

Food retail trends in Italy

Current Trends in Italy’s Food Retail Market

So how do Italians buy food, really? If you’re thinking of food markets in every town, brimming with people buying organic meat and vegetables directly from farmers, you may be in for a partial disappointment. In today’s Italy, most people buy their food at the supermarket.

That’s not to say that love for good food has disappeared. Modern life may be less bucolic, but supermarkets in Italy have come a long way in the pursuit of quality.

What an Italian supermarket looks like

At first glance, Italian supermarkets are very similar to any store in the UK. However, if you take a closer look you’ll notice that some products occupy a different amount of shelf space. For example, you could find:

  •  A limited choice of butter and a wider choice of olive oil
  • Lots of different brands of mineral water
  • Almost no presence of foreign wines
  • A wider choice of local ham and cheese
  • More calf and less lamb meat. Although less common, horse and rabbit can also be found.

At the same time, you could recognise many current food trends: vegan, vegetarian, gluten-free, organic, etc. Read more